A New Survey Reveals That More Than 90% Of Neurons in The Visual Cortex of the Brain Don't Work the Way Scientists Thought

A New Survey Reveals That More Than 90% Of Neurons in The Visual Cortex of the Brain Don’t Work the Way Scientists Thought

A new survey of the activity of almost 60,000 neurons within the mouse visual system reveals how far we have now to go to know how the brain computes. Revealed today within the international journal Nature Neuroscience, the evaluation led by researchers on the Allen Institute disclose that more than 90% of neurons within the visual cortex, a part of the brain that processes our visual world, do not work the way in which scientists thought—and it is not yet clear how they do work.

The new research is the first large-scale evaluation of the publicly available information from the Allen Brain Observatory, a wide survey that captures the activity of tens of thousands of neurons within the mouse visual system.

The researchers analyzed the activity of almost 60,000 totally different neurons within the visual elements of the cortex and the outermost shell of the mind, as animals see totally different simple photos, images and brief video clips—including the opening shot from the traditional Orson Welles film “Touch of Evil” (chosen as a result of it has lots of motion and is a single shot with no cuts).

The researchers’ new evaluation discovered that less than 10% of the 60,000 neurons responded following the textbook model. Of the rest, about two-thirds showed some dependable response; however, their responses had been extra specialized than the basic models would predict.

The last 3rd of neurons showed some activity; however, they did not light up reliably to any of the stimuli within the experiment—it is not clear what these neurons are doing, the researchers stated.