Competition Between Healthy And Dysfunctional Platelets Visualization Might Help To Improve Treatment Strategies, Says The Study

Competition Between Healthy And Dysfunctional Platelets Visualization Might Help To Improve Treatment Strategies, Says The Study

Bleeding can occur during a surgical procedure, after trauma, or even spontaneously. And when it does, blood cells known as platelets rush in to stick to the injured blood vessels and cease bleeding as quickly as possible. Or at the least, that is what should happen. When the reason for bleeding just isn’t having enough platelets, that is known as thrombocytopenia. Other causes of bleeding contain platelets that do not work well, and these conditions are referred to as platelet function disorders.

Regardless of the reason for bleeding, one of the vital common treatments is platelet transfusion therapy, which doctors have discovered works quite effectively for people with thrombocytopenia as a result of they simply want more platelets. However, in people with certain platelet function disorders, platelet transfusions aren’t effective.

Previous research has advised that the patient’s dysfunctional platelets would possibly get in the way in which of the healthy transfused platelets. The lab of Wolfgang Bergmeier, Ph.D., professor of biochemistry and biophysics, hypothesized that there’s competition between the dysfunctional platelets and the healthy transfused platelets on the site of blood vessel injury, and this might cause platelet transfusion therapy to be much less effective.

Robert H. Lee, Ph.D., a postdoctoral fellow within the Bergmeier lab, led experiments utilizing mouse models and state-of-the-art imaging to visualize how healthy and dysfunctional platelets interact on the site of injury.

When Lee and colleagues performed real-time imaging research, they observed that healthy and dysfunctional platelets do indeed compete with one another for space within the injured blood vessel. Their research additionally characterized the molecular mechanisms by which dysfunctional platelets delay the adhesion and function of transfused cells, information that might be important to improve treatment strategies.